I am in the throes of the final final steps of this crazy project I am working on. I have a few last minute things that deal with VAST amounts of data and the performance of dealing with that data. We have a data copier in our system already that starts with a set of 15 items and duplicates them into a list as many times as you need. The problem is the data is not very spread out that way. I’m going to be dealing with tens-of-thousands of rows and sorting issues and the like. With 10,000 of the same “City” values in a row, for example, it’s hard to tell if there are sorting issues without scrolling until your mouse gets tired.

Because I’m a geek and I like to play with code and language sometimes:

A dozen years ago I was writing a tool for users that needed to generate temporary passwords. We’ve all seen those “Tts900OsvE”. This was in the early internet years (web) and I just couldn’t see writing a system with such a low IQ. So I wrote a fun little subsystem that created more meaningful and enjoyable (and memorable) phrases as passwords. I created an array of verbs and nouns and adjectives and told it how many words I needed together. Out popped awesome temporary passwords.

I spent a whole weekend staring at a few thousand to look for obvious innuendo. There were several. Some words got detention.

I thought I’d revive this little subsystem for my “random data generation” problem. It had to be re-written, but that’s part of the geek-fun. In the end I used more words and more types.Most of my data was easier to come by than in the old days when typing it by hand was the only viable solution. I went to wikipedia and looked for the top 100 companies to work for, the most used verbs, the cities listed by population. Things like that.

I thought I’d share a few of the phrases:

  • Little Jimmy Carter use just part
  • Small George Bush walk in texture
  • Big John Adams escape back plastic
  • New Harry S Truman yell too achieve
  • Large Martin Van Burren give back life

 

Just in case the rest of the world really needs to find out about the deep dark secrets of Martin Van Burren or Barrack Obama I’ll attach the class here.

 

Java:

Usage, as I like to make it, is as simple as possible:

Nice and easy. Just use:

PhraseGenerator.java

 

JavaScript:

I ended up porting this to Javascript also. That seems to be common these days. I’m sure it will jump over to Objective-C at some point too. Ah well, more goodness for you:

And use away:

MMPhraseGenerator.js

As always, my code is covered by the “do whatever you want with this, claim it as your own” license.